Day 11: spacious closure & closing worship

This final blog post of mine marks our last night on the Pipeline Pilgrimage.

The day has had a sense of spacious closure to it, the last day I can hold in my open palms before the ritual of tomorrow’s sending off, our final full day moving after the pattern we have built.

Our experiences today were both distinct and kin to our other days. We sang “the Farthest Field” in morning worship, and tears followed for some. We inflated a peaceful silence for the first hour of our walk. We sojourned through woods, neighborhoods, and fields, and shared thoughts on the climate movement, faith, and the beauty of our surroundings. We better learned one another’s stories.

Joyful surprises found us – a trumpet sent us off with “When the Saints Come Marching In,” and a familiar trail angel, Ellie Richardson from the MACUCC, greeted us with warm brownies. Through headstands, on swingsets, and by way searching for dragons in the clouds, we played. Our team of Great Climate Marchers comprised our sturdy backbone. First Congregation of Pelham honored us this evening with a sumptuous feast.

We engaged in our final evening of spiritual conversation, sharing our gratitude and seeking to understand how the pilgrimage has informed “what is our work to do?” We each brought a unique perspective, our own sense of personal calling.

Yet one undercurrent churned beneath what each of us had to say: in this pilgrimage, something special has come together. The Pipeline Pilgrimage will continue to stand out for me as the most memorable and empowering piece of activism I have known. This pilgrimage has been marvelous in the thickest sense of the word. Our walk has been so much more than I could have expected, and not because of any one of us, but all of us together, led by something greater than ourselves.

So we hope to share this with you during our closing worship tomorrow at Christ Church United of Dracut, beginning at one o’clock and running until three. We invite you to join us in a moment of Easter hope and transformation, knowing that this pilgrimage – like all others – will never really end, but becomes a practice of resurrection when we bring it back into the rest of our lives.

May the light continue to guide our paths, and yours.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Day 11: spacious closure & closing worship

  1. THANK YOU ALL!!! THANK YOU FOR YOUR LEADERSHIP!! THANK YOU FOR YOUR STEWARDSHIP–WILLINGENESS TO TAKE THIS TIME OUT OF YOUR LIVES TO BRING ATTENTION TO THE DEVESTATION OF OUR PRECIOUS LAND WHICH WILL OCCUR IF THIS PIPELINE IS APPROVED!! THANK YOU FOR YOUR EFFORT TO CONTRAST THE MYTH OF “NATURAL” GAS as a “BRIDGE FUEL” BY CALLING IT WHAT IT IS – METHANE, a VERY DESTRUCTIVE GHG for OUR CLIMATE!! THANK YOU FOR CALLING THIS PROPOSED PIPELINE A METHAN PIPELINE!! BIG HUGS TO YOU ALL!Bev

    Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2015 04:29:31 +0000 To: nadesha@msn.com

    Like

  2. I am deeply grateful to the organizers, to the sturdy long-distance pipeline pilgrims, and to everyone who walked, for their leadership and friendship. My participation, just 21 of the total 150 miles, was ever so modest. But nevertheless it was, by far, the best thing I have done for myself in a long time. The whole of it—the silences, the walking, the silent walking, the quiet encountering of crows, phoebes, trees, rivers, sheep, people along the road (adults and children involved in their lives), the houses, fields, trees, the crushed bottles and cans underfoot, the white horse who shyly engaged us, the thoughtful conversations with new friends, and those silences, and that walking, walking, especially the silent walking—did quiet me far more effectively than my ordinary meditations, valuable as they are.

    Thus quieted, I heard what I believe, that there is no reason to doubt the consensus of the climate scientists, and that their assessment is careful and true: that we humans are steering this beautiful planet toward catastrophe. And I heard a curious secret whispered to me: the fact that many, indeed most, others also do believe what the scientists say, but they are managing, as I had managed, to live each day not hearing what they believe.

    It seems the goal is now to sustain the quieting, so to be able to heed what one hears and then to act, with others, to correct the course.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s